Are Rafting Adventures Good for You?

Four Reasons Why Whitewater Rafting Makes You Happy

Rafting makes you happy by reducing stress and increasing well-being. Spending time in a physical environment where you are not bombarded with the daily pressures of life is equally exhilarating and calming. You can escape to a place where the phone does not ring and the computer does not beckon. Pretty soon you have taken off your watch and do not really care what time it is anymore. Guides call this the transition to ‘river time’ as in, “we are on river time now.”

Rafting makes you happy because nature nurtures. Wilderness nurtures the soul. Spending time in nature grounds you to your physical environment and gives you a sense of peace that cannot be found in the hectic pace of daily life. Watching the sun rise over the canyon rim can give you a sense of serenity that often cannot be found in the distracting lives we lead. You will find time for reflection sitting next to a quiet pool on the river, something we all need to rejuvenate the spirit.

Rafting makes you happy by building self-esteem. Trying something physical and out of your comfort zone builds self-confidence. Paddling a rapid in a kayak or a paddle boat makes you feel accomplished and ready to try more. When describing your achievements to friends and family you can use this river lingo and tell it like a fish story: “I saw the river up close and personal, in Big Mallard the waves were (use your hands or a tall building to illustrate your point here) this big!”

Rafting makes you happy by motivating you. Once you have tried your first new challenge, see above, you will clamor for more. You may want to learn how to row a big oar boat, take daily hikes, swim a rapid or challenge everyone at horseshoes. The sky is the limit. Look out; once you are home, your increased confidence will inspire you to continue challenging yourself physically and outdoors.

Learn more about whitewater rafting adventures by contacting us!

 

Are Rafting Adventures Good for You? was last modified: January 3rd, 2020 by Sean Bierle